Archive for July, 2009

31
Jul
09

Trine

trine_screenshot_2009_03_wizard_liftTrine

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31
Jul
09

13 questions: Eskil Steenberg

GMZzz: Some of your blog posts refer to your previous work job. I’m just curious: where did you work before going independent?
Eskil Steenberg: I have worked mostly in research and development around computer graphics.
GMZzz: How did you end up making the decision of going at it alone?
Eskil Steenberg: I didn’t have much of a choice. I had no one to help me and no funding so i had to do it all by my self.
GMZzz: I keep asking this because I know a lot of talented people out there are scared of leaving the comfort of a job and start something on their own. Valuable people, with valuable ideas that might never get realized because, let’s face it, the risk is enormous. Given your experience so far, would you recommend this to anyone?
Eskil Steenberg: I would recommend it to everyone, I think people can do amazing things if they just set their minds to it. If you just manage to take the decision to really go for it you have come along way.
GMZzz: How do you manage to fund your work? Do you also work on something else besides LOVE, something that can generate they funds you need?
Eskil Steenberg: I don’t really, I have done some short term work, and I’m always looking for consultancy  work, but the workload of Love have kept me dirt poor.
GMZzz: Most of the independent developers focus on small applications or games, they do Flash based games or try to get rich on the Apple Store. You are developing an MMO and you do that all alone. Why on Earth would you want to tackle a genre that most development studios seem to fail at? (how crazy are you?)
Eskil Steenberg: Well first of all i would say that Love is not comparable to most of the games you would call MMOs. It is very different, in some ways smaller, but in many ways harder. It is a fairly crazy thing to do, but the most important thing is that you can keep yourself motivated, and making something you really enjoy making is more important then doing what is easy.
GMZzz: LOVE has gotten a lot of press love lately, and surely the people “in the know” are really excited about it; the buzz is there but this is still an indie MMO title. How do you think it will fare up against the bigger boys? Do you think you’re going to compete against titles like WoW or you want to target a different (smaller) market?
Eskil Steenberg: I think it will be very much a different thing from “the big boys”. Other then that i don’t really dare hope any one will like it.
GMZzz: How did the concept for Love change over time?
Eskil Steenberg: A lot of things has changed, but i would say that in many ways it is very similar. All major tech has been the same and so has the basic gameplay. the parts that has been most trial and error is the procedural content generation.
GMZzz: Let’s say you woke up one morning and you are the CEO of Blizzard. After the regular dip in your private Olympic-sized pool full of money, you get to work using your nifty personal teleporting device. Your meeting for the day concerns the next Blizzard project and you have to decide what the studio will work on next. What would you like to focus on?
Eskil Steenberg: First of all, I would probably not do what ever i wanted, sure they have huge resources, but if you work for a company like blizzard, you need to think a lot about who you are and what is right for the company you are working for, even if you are the CEO. Similarly Love is very much a game designed to fit what i can do and the resources and tech that i have like my tools. I can say this, I do have list of things i want to do in the future. There are some new tools I would like to develop and i think i have solved how to do an RTS on console. What project i will end up doing will very much depend on where i am and what resources and opportunities I will have then.
GMZzz: Unlike many other independent games studios, you are just one guy. You work on everything from tools to game design. Did you ever consider getting somebody else on board?
Eskil Steenberg: Well, again i cant afford to do it, and also the entire thing is by now so complex it is going to require substantial effort until someone else can come in and help.
GMZzz: Does this mean that, after LOVE, you might consider starting a development studio with more than one employee?
Eskil Steenberg: I hope so.
GMZzz: You’ve developed some extraordinarily versatile tools, that encompass your philosophy about how the production workflow of a game should look like. Do you plan on going commercial with these tools as well?
Eskil Steenberg: Right now all my tools are available for download on my site. In the future I may make some new tools that could become commercial.
GMZzz: A few very interesting things have happened this past year. For example, the indie scene has seen a creative (and, sometimes, commercial) boom and we’re now seeing the re-emergence of the Adventure genre, long thought dead. Both of these events were unthinkable a couple of years ago. Do you think that the games industry/market is finally starting to mature? How would you like it to evolve next?
Eskil Steenberg: I think it is expanding, “maturing” sounds as if it will stop evolving, in some ways it already have, but i hope we will see some new developments that will shake things up a bit. I’m hoping the procedural tech in love can be a part of that.
GMZzz: We’re always on the look-out for interesting projects that relate to the games industry. Are there any such projects that have piqued your interest?
Eskil Steenberg: No, right now there are basically no games that push the envelope. Right now we are moving towards games with more scripted sequences, set peaces, cut scenes, and recorded dialog. In general more “production values” and less dynamic content.
love

LOVE

Eskil Steenberg is a one man army. Not only does he work on one of the most promising MMO’s out there (LOVE), but he’s crazy enough to do it all alone.

One of the most fascinating figures in the games industry, Eskil is on a mission to change the way we look at (and work on) games. We could’t miss the chance to ask him a few questions!

We strongly suggest you take a peek at his work (be it tools, game projects or just his day to day ramblings) and then enjoy the interview.

GMZzz: Some of your blog posts refer to your previous work job. I’m just curious: where did you work before going independent?

Eskil Steenberg: I have worked mostly in research and development around computer graphics.

GMZzz: How did you end up making the decision of going at it alone?

Eskil Steenberg: I didn’t have much of a choice. I had no one to help me and no funding so i had to do it all by myself.

GMZzz: I keep asking this because I know a lot of talented people out there are scared of leaving the comfort of a job and start something on their own. Valuable people, with valuable ideas that might never get realized because, let’s face it, the risk is enormous. Given your experience so far, would you recommend this to anyone?

Eskil Steenberg: I would recommend it to everyone; I think people can do amazing things if they just set their minds to it. If you just manage to take the decision to really go for it you have come a long way.

GMZzz: How do you manage to fund your work? Do you also work on something else besides LOVE, something that can generate the funds you need?

Eskil Steenberg: I don’t really, I have done some short term work, and I’m always looking for consultancy work, but the workload of Love has kept me dirt poor.

GMZzz: Most of the independent developers focus on small applications or games, they do Flash based games or try to get rich on the Apple Store. You are developing an MMO and you do that all alone. Why on Earth would you want to tackle a genre that most development studios seem to fail at? (how crazy are you?)

Eskil Steenberg:  Well first of all i would say that Love is not comparable to most of the games you would call MMOs. It is very different, in some ways smaller, but in many ways harder. It is a fairly crazy thing to do, but the most important thing is that you can keep yourself motivated, and making something you really enjoy making is more important than doing what is easy.

GMZzz: LOVE has gotten a lot of press love lately, and surely the people “in the know” are really excited about it; the buzz is there but this is still an indie MMO title. How do you think it will fare up against the bigger boys? Do you think you’re going to compete against titles like WoW or you want to target a different (smaller) market?

Eskil Steenberg: I think it will be very much a different thing from “the big boys”. Other then that i don’t really dare hope any one will like it.

GMZzz: How did the concept for Love change over time?

Eskil Steenberg: A lot of things has changed, but i would say that in many ways it is very similar. All major tech has been the same and so has the basic gameplay. the parts that has been most trial and error is the procedural content generation.

GMZzz: Let’s say you woke up one morning and you are the CEO of Blizzard. After the regular dip in your private Olympic-sized pool full of money, you get to work using your nifty personal teleporting device. Your meeting for the day concerns the next Blizzard project and you have to decide what the studio will work on next. What would you like to focus on?

Eskil Steenberg: First of all, I would probably not do whatever I wanted, sure they have huge resources, but if you work for a company like blizzard, you need to think a lot about who you are and what is right for the company you are working for, even if you are the CEO. Similarly Love is very much a game designed to fit what i can do and the resources and tech that I have like my tools. I can say this, I do have list of things i want to do in the future. There are some new tools I would like to develop and i think i have solved how to do an RTS on console. What project I will end up doing will very much depend on where i am and what resources and opportunities I will have then.

GMZzz: Unlike many other independent games studios, you are just one guy. You work on everything from tools to game design. Did you ever consider getting somebody else on board?

Eskil Steenberg: Well, again I can’t afford to do it, and also the entire thing is by now so complex it is going to require substantial effort until someone else can come in and help.

GMZzz: Does this mean that, after LOVE, you might consider starting a development studio with more than one employee?

Eskil Steenberg: I hope so.

GMZzz: You’ve developed some extraordinarily versatile tools, that encompass your philosophy about how the production workflow of a game should look like. Do you plan on going commercial with these tools as well?

Eskil Steenberg: Right now all my tools are available for download on my site. In the future I may make some new tools that could become commercial.

GMZzz: A few very interesting things have happened this past year. For example, the indie scene has seen a creative (and, sometimes, commercial) boom and we’re now seeing the re-emergence of the Adventure genre, long thought dead. Both of these events were unthinkable a couple of years ago. Do you think that the games industry/market is finally starting to mature? How would you like it to evolve next?

Eskil Steenberg: I think it is expanding, “maturing” sounds as if it will stop evolving, in some ways it already have, but i hope we will see some new developments that will shake things up a bit. I’m hoping the procedural tech in love can be a part of that.

GMZzz: We’re always on the look-out for interesting projects that relate to the games industry. Are there any such projects that have piqued your interest?

Eskil Steenberg: No, right now there are basically no games that push the envelope. Right now we are moving towards games with more scripted sequences, set pieces, cut scenes, and recorded dialog. In general, more “production values” and less dynamic content.

30
Jul
09

The Beggar

thebeggarThe  Beggar

29
Jul
09

Fig. 8

Fig. 8

“… a game where you control a bicycle through technical diagram suburbia.” – now that’s awesome!

29
Jul
09

Hammerfight

Hammerfight

29
Jul
09

Boss Badie showreel

Lunnye Devitsy / Tormishire / Satan Sam

Check the Boss Baddie website to try / buy these games.

28
Jul
09

Space Invaders Infinity Gene

spaceinvadersiphoneSpace Invaders Inifity Gene (iPhone)




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